For Love Or Your Life – The Jalonek Murder in Lviv for the Hand of Anna Wilczek (Lviv: The History of One City Part 31)

The house at Rynok Square 3 is often overlooked, sandwiched as it is between the rich splendor of the Baldinelli Palace and the brooding, iconic Black House. Rynok 3 was first owned by Lviv’s most powerful lawmaker, the city councilor Wilczek, hence the building’s name, House of the Wilczek Family. This house would become his beautiful daughter Anna’s wedding dowry, but it only happened after an unforgettable explosion of emotions and violence between two men who could not contain their passion for her.

House of the Wilczek Family

House of the Wilczek Family at Rynok 3 in Lviv (Credit: Aeou)

Shall We Dance – Two Men & A Beautiful Woman
Urbano della Rippa Ubaldini was part of a wave of Italians who came to Lviv during the 16th and 17th centuries. Many of these men were traders. Due to their wealth and connections they were highly influential in city affairs and were able to acquire citizenship. Ubaldini, a Florentine had come to Lviv for another reason as well, he was an exile. He had been involved in a plot against the powerful Medici family back in Italy. Though he was a relation of the pope, Ubaldini’s life was not safe in Tuscany. Thus he fled eastward, first to Krakow and then on to Lviv.  Ironically, this would also later be the same exile trajectory of Roberto Baldinelli, who would own the palace at Rynok Square 2. No matter how far these men moved abroad, they could not escape trouble. In Ubaldini’s case the trouble  would be romantic, rather than political. A wedding party would be the unlikely setting for Ubaldini’s latest brush with controversy.

Anna Wilczek was just 18 years old and already she was known for her remarkable beauty. Not yet engaged, she was one of the most sought after women in the city. She had drawn the romantic attentions of Ubaldini and a Polish gentleman, Pawel Jalonek. Their dueling passions for Anna collided in dramatic fashion at a wedding party in the year 1580. Almost simultaneously both men asked Anna to dance. She was said to have paused for just a moment and then chose Ubaldini. This was too much for Jalonek to handle. Acting on a combination of wounded pride and crestfallen desire, he reactively slapped Ubaldini. The Florentine then went him one better, stabbing Jalonek with a dagger. The Pole reeled from the blow. Bleeding profusely, he was taken away for urgent medical care. It would do no good, Jalonek was soon dead.

Sculpture at Lychakiv Cemetery in Lviv

Romantic pursuits – a sculpture at Lychakiv Cemetery in Lviv

Getting Off – Ubaldini’s Crime Without Punishment
Ubaldini was arrested and charged with murder. Controversy abounded. Was the Florentine really just defending himself? His retaliatory stab seemed totally out of proportion to the slap he had suffered. Both men had lost all control of themselves because of their passionate love for one woman. Anna Wilczek’s beauty and grace had brought hot blooded passions to the surface and led directly to murder. Would the punishment for Ubaldini fit his crime? This may have been the age of the Renaissance, but it was also pre-Enlightenment. Crimes were punished in the harshest of manners, executions were common. On the west side of Rynok Square men lost their heads not to love, but decapitation. Fortunately for Ubaldini there were many circumstances in his favor. Before he died, Jalonek was said to have forgiven Ubaldini for the violence he had inflicted on him. In addition, Ubaldini was a powerful and wealthy merchant. He had many defenders in both Lviv’s Italian and business communities. It is said that truth can set a person free, but wealth works even greater wonders.

There were a few other key persons supporting Ubaldini, most importantly Anna Wilczek. The fact that her father held the powerful position of city councilor cannot be overlooked. The story also won the hearts of many women in Lviv. There was something deeply romantic about this fight for the love of a woman. According to the local Lviv historian Ilko Lemko, “The wives of the Lviv judges did not give their husbands a moment’s peace – neither during the day or at night, and they even posted pickets at the Town Hall.” With all this in his favor, Ubaldini was soon a free man. It might be said that his acquittal was an inside job. He was beyond reproach and above the law. Freedom was not the only thing he won either as he would take the hand of Anna Wilczek in marriage. The couple moved into Rynok 3 where they lived in happiness and contentment while raising a family.

A Noble Love
Perhaps it was better that Pawel Jalonek suffered a mortal wound rather than have to see his beloved Anna with the man who had bested him. Some might say that a life is too much to give up for love, but there is something endearing about Jalonek. Jalonek lost all self-control in a moment of unrestrained pride fueled by passionate love. He did not just want to dance with Anna Wilczek, he wanted to win her heart and ultimately her hand in marriage. It was not to be, but that does not make his death, like his love, any less noble.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s